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on the northeast coast of japan. >> thanks very much. it's obviously a desperately worrying time for for them and out to them all. >>>. >> translator: we need now for everybody to move out of the 20 kilometer radius from the number one plant. and in areas from 20 to 30 kilometers from the power plant depending on what happens at the power plant. we would like to ask you to remain indoors at home or in your offices. >> words of warning from japan's prime minister after a fire broke out of the fukushima nuclear power plant. this is the area affected. it's now day four for an earthquake and tsunami rocked the country. >> from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> you're watching cnn's continuing coverage of the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. and we begin with key new developments. the japanese government says there has been a surge in radiation levels outside japan's fukushima nuclear power plant. and as a precaution, officials are telling everyone within a 30-kilometer radius to remain indoors. japan's official death toll from friday's quake and tsunami stands at 2,500, with mo
. welcome to our viewers around the world. has the cnn special report on the ongoing crisis in japan. i'm don lemon. >> hello. over the next hour, an indepth look at the unbelievable tragedy that unfolded in japan in recent weeks, from the first tremors to a crushing tsunami, to the brink of a nuclear meltdown. >> and also the latest fallout from japan's nuclear disabled plant, and radiation exposure to the public and food supply. >> but first we have a disturbing story developing out of libya. >> there's video of an hysterical woman bursting into a tripoli hotel filled with journalists. her name is iman and she is screaming a horrifying story accusing 15 members of the militia of raping and beating her over a two-day movement. >> they moved to shut her up. all the while dragging her away from uncertain fate. they smashed cameras, including ours, trying to destroy the evidence. we did get this video of it. let's get to nick robertson who is staying at that hotel for more. >> reporter: the lady came into the hotel this morning. she was screaming. she was a middle aged woman. she seemed f
." >> a second explosion at the damaged fukushima at -- power plant and 11 people are injuried. japan offers assurances that risks remain low. tens of thousands of people are still missing amidst the race of trying to find loved ones. >> hello and welcome. also in this program, japan's stocks tumble. they take emergency action by pouring in cash to the market. >> japan's nuclear crisis appears to be deepening. in the last few hours, there has been a second explosion at the fukushima nuclear plant. speaking in the last hour, japan's cabinet secretary said the risk of today's explosion caused an uncontrolable leak of radiation is low. but the u.s. said it had moved away from the area after one of its aircraft carriers detected low-level radiation 160 kilometers off shore. tens of thousands of people have been evacuated from the area. let's go to my correspondent who is in japan in the sendai area with all the very latest. >> hello to you. you join me on the outskirts of sendai city. this main wall behind me is where the wall of tsunami, sea water, washed up about a half a mile from the harbor
>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
>> hello, everyone. welcome to special coverage of the latest events in japan. >> here's what he's happening at this moment. fears grow of a meltdown at the fukushima nuclear power ant in japanfter a second explosion at the damaged facility. fuel rods and another reactor in fukushima are the u.n. regular agency says no chain reaction is taking place there. japanese engineers are stepping up efforts to prevent a meltdown at the nuclear power plant damaged in last friday's earthquake. the fukushima plant has been hit by two explosions. the latest happened early on monday. rapidly falling water levels have expos fuel rods in another reactor, increasing the risk of a core meltdown. >> it's the third day of japan's nuclear crisis, and the situation at the fukushima power plant remains critical. now there has been a second explosion there. aerial footage shows two damaged reactor suctures. a surveillance camera captured the moment of the blast which blew apart the concrete building surrending the number three reactor. the japanese government says this was a hydrogen explosion. >> we as
edition of "world business today" as cnn continues its coverage of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. >>> sea walter being poured from helicopters on to japan's damaged nuclear reactors. that is the scene on thursday. engineers attempt once again to avert catastrophic radiation leaks. the japanese military is dropping tons of water on to two of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant trying to cool the plant's fuel rods. but the company that runs the plant now reports that the radiation levels actually increased. they're also bringing in police, water cannon. officials say radiation levels right now are too high for personnel to venture inside. >> translator: spence force conducted a spring of water from the air. and the police are also going to start the water spraying by the water cannon trucks. so we're trying to combine the two approaches to maximize the effect of water spraying. >> hundreds of thousands of residents in the area have been evacuated. many are seeking refuge in public shelters. japan ordered people to move at least 20 kilometers away from the plant.
, this is "world business today." we're following two big stories for you this friday, march 18th. >>> in japan, urgent attempts to avert a nuclear crisis enter a second week at the fukushima daiichi plant. workers douse one of the rea reactors with a water cannon. >>> in libya, gunfire in benghazi. but this time in celebration. rebels are rejoicing. but fears of retaliation by moammar gadhafi's forces are pushing the price of oil higher of. >>> so let's go straight to one of our top stories. the u.n. security council has put moammar gadhafi on notice that it will no longer permit his military bombardment of rebel positions from the air. while the council approved a no-fly zone on thursday authorizing "all necessary measures to protect civilians," libyan's ambassador to the united nations warmly welcomed thursday's revolution. he sides with the opposition and has called on gadhafi to step down. >> i would like to start by thanking the members of the security council for the resolution today. it is a clear message -- it is a clear message to the libyan people that they are not alone, that the in
in japan. and just moments ago, a somber message from japan's emperor in a rare but brief public address live on television. the emperor said he was praying for the safety of those affected by last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. the japanese government is telling residents within a 10-kilometer radius of a second nuclear plant to evacuate. meanwhile workers have returned to the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant after the government lifted a plant evacuation order because radiation levels were dangerously high. concern continues to grow over the safety of spent nuclear fuel rods at that facility. and authorities are investigating the cause of white smoke or possibly steam rising from the plant's number three nuclear reactor. a top government official says radiation levels around the plant still fluctuate, but it's unclear why. >> translator: one thing i would like to confirm, now this increase in radiation reading and in number three reactor, the containment vessel is it possible that the containment vessel has failed? well, number three reactor needed to have water injected. an
on this in the coming days. >>> a powerful earthquake has shaken northeastern japan. the tremor occurred at around 11:45 a.m. on wednesday. the quake had an estimated magnitude of 7.2 and was centered off the coast of northeastern japan. the depth of the quake was 10 kilometers. japan's meet lodge cam agency issued a tsunami adviser along the coast of northeastern japan. once again, a powerful earthquake has shaken northeaster japan. the tremor occurred around 11:45 a.m. on wednesday local time. them quake had an estimated magnitude of 7.2 and was centered off the coast of -- in northeastern japan. the depth of the quake was estimated at 10 kilometers. and japan's meteorological agency issued a tsunami advisory off the coast of northeastern japan. >>> japan has a new face for dip lomascy dipcy. -- diplomacy. he will replace serjei maehara who resigned over a political donation scandal. takeaki matsumoto became state tear. he is said to have expertise in financial, fiscal and security policies. takeaki matsumoto resigned for accepting political donations from a foreign -- it dealt another blow to the
>> hello and welcome to our special coverage of the latest events in japan. first what is happening at the moment -- a un's nuclear chief calls the situation after the stricken fukushima very worrying after a blast car radiation levels rose for a time. at the u.s. is sending more specialists to help al with the threat. in the country's -- in the country, the northeast humanitarian crisis -- the government has appealed for calm as people in tokyo began to flee the city or stock up on the essential supplies. >> in japan, the un's the nuclear energy agency says the containment wall at one of the reactors at the fukushima power plant may have been breached after an explosion on monday. radiation levels rose after a fire and separate reactor blast. most of the people within 30 kilometers have been evacuated. those remaining are being urged to stay indoors. above normal radiation levels have been measured in tokyo, 250 kilometers to the south. >> it tuesday's fire in reactor no. 4 and damage from explosions at the other reactor blocks pose a potentially disastrous situation. reports say p
with gregory jaczko, chairman of the nuclear regular rah story commission, on japan's nuclear crisis and his agency's response. then more on the nuclear situation in japan as we take you live for a briefing of the nuclear regulatory industry. and later the cato institute has a conference marking the first anniversary of the signing of the health care law and it impact on the industry, the federal budget and the economy. >> tonight on c-span2, actor harry sheerer talks about the media's coverage of his adopted hometown of new orleans. he recently released a new film about hurricane katrina and louisiana called "the big uneasy. "it examines the causes of the city's flood after the 2005 hurricane. 7:15 pacific. >> tonight on c-span3, a white house summit on bullying featuring remarks from first lady michelle obama and president obama who discusses his own experiences with bullying as a child. >> as adults we all remember what it was like to see kids picked on in the schoolyard, and i have to say with big ears and the name that i have, i wasn't immune. [laughter] i didn't emerge u
five minutes. >> live from studio seven, it's monday, march 14th midnight in japan. we want to get you up to speed on the tsunami that rocked japan. the official death toll is more than 1800, but thousands more are missing. that number will go up as those searching reach more hard hit areas. in the middle, amazing stories of survival. one man explains what kept him going. >> i thought i was dying when i was pushed in the water. for my folks and my family, i decided to make every effort is to survive. >> grim news from the east coast. crews found about 2,000 bodies in the region according to kyoto news agency. if confirmed this would be the largest discovery of bodies from the earthquake and tsunami. >> people in japan dealing with fears of a nuclear disaster. a second explosion can damage the power plant today. a cabinet secretary said 11 people were hurt, but no massive leakage was detected. still many were worried. >> i'm scared because i can see the radiation. >> tests found low levels of radioactive contamination on 17 crew members from a helicopter. they returned to the uss ronald
>>> welcome back, everyone, to our special coverage of the disaster in japan. i'm michael holmes. >> we want to welcome our viewers in north america as well. it is 1:00 p.m. in japan. and there seems to be no letup in the fear that's gripping the disaster stricken nation. tokyo is now requesting help from the u.s. military in this emergency. we want to bring you all we know so far. japanese officials say part of a nuclear reactor containment vessel at the fukushima daiichi power plant may be damaged. they say a breach in the containment vessel in reactor number three may be what's caused a white cloud of smoke or steam to rise above the power plant. they can't confirm either way on that. now, already, there have been several explosions and fires at the plant since friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. workers have been trying to stop a nuclear meltdown by cooling those damaged reactors from which radiation has escaped. however, officials say workers have now suspended their operations, and have been evacuated. authorities also say radiation readings at fukushima daiichi have b
. >>shepard: thank you very much. good morning from tokyo. it's 4:00 a.m. in the capital city in japan, 3 p.m. in new york city and the japanese people will awake as the sunrises in an hour and 45 minutes to learn that power outages will be rolling across this nation as they work to conserve fuel as 30 percent of all energy across japan comes from nuclear power and now there are great concerns of nuclear meltdown on the northeast coast a couple of hundred kilometers from where we are now. behind me is the rainbow bridge a fixture in tokyo. it is usually lit up in many colors and it is shut down as are the tops of skyscrapers as they work for voluntary energy conservation in the hopes that extra tokyo will not have to face the kind of black outs that could be necessary across this nation. high alert cross japan with nuclear concerns, thousands of people washing ashore, and many thousands still missing, and a disaster which the prime minister says here tokyo and the rest of the japan have not seen since world war ii. it began with an epic earthquake the most powerful earthquakes on record, th
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
. >> i'm sarah kelly with the business news, welcome. our top stories at this hour -- in japan, the military has used wear from firefighters to cool reactors. the ieae says it has stabilized, but it could still worsen. the security council is voting on libya as the gaddafi forces push into rebel-held territory. the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog says efforts made by japan to cool reactor it's and fuel rods at the fukushima power plant have stabilized the situation but warning it could deteriorate. engineers have worked through the night to install a power line for water pumps needed to cool two reactors and a storage site for spent nuclear fuel rods. helicopters have also been dumping water on overheating reactors to stave off a meltdown. fire trucks have also joined in the effort. >> japan has been pinning a lot of its hopes on these trucks. they can get within 80 meters of the reactor. the trucks have repeatedly doused the pool with water as shown in this graphic from japanese tv. authorities were guarded about the operation's success. some reports say radiation levels have risen s
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
stock market meltdown, stocks hit hard after a top european energy official all but said japan hang it up. the european union's commissioner for energy today warning that the nuclear power plant in japan is and i quote, "effectively out-of-control," and the situation could deteriorate. traders here did not like it one bit like they did not like later news that wholesale prices here were way up and home construction here was way down. for investors, way, way, way too much. the dow jones industrial average dived 242 points and it continues. and now, gary says they have reason to be nervous. gary, what is going on here? >>guest: you said it, it is all the above. but you know my complaints, the high of the wholesale prices in three or four decades but the fed, the people that are supposed to be on the look out to watch these things and to do something about it, say there is not any inflation and a big motto is, if they don't start doing something about it the market will and that is what the market is doing right now. of course you had one heck of a catalyst with japan, housing which ha
at a nuclear plant in the earthquake-devastated region of japan. the japanese government is confirming a radiation leak has happened. and they are fighting against a nuclear meltdown. we have a live report for you from tokyo ahead. >> the massive earthquake triggering a ripple effect across the pacific hitting hawaii and governor brown if california call for a state of emergency along the northern coast including in santa cruz. >> in japan, the third largest producer of nuclear power and how trouble at the nuclear reactor could devastate global markets. friend friend hour two begins right now. >> good morning, everyone, thank you for joining us. and now you need to say glued to the show for three hours because there is so much breaking news including what is going on in japan. they are racing to prevent a meltdown after an explosion at the largest nuclear plant. the nation is getting a look at the destruction. you can see the images. >> these are new images as crews are getting out to assess the damage. adam housley is on the ground in tokyo assessing what is going on. tokyo is the sta
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
disaster in japan. here is what is happening right now. a massive earthquake has hit northern japan, triggering a huge tsunami that devastated hundreds of miles of coastline. the earthquake measured 8.9 on the richter scale, one of the largest ever reported. the tremor sparked at least 80 fires. beyond japan, tsunami warnings not cover almost all of the pacific rim, from russia to south america. >> the earth and the ocean turned against japan on friday. a massive earthquake hit the country and triggered a tsunami that has devastated much of the country's northeastern shore line. police say more than 300 people have died, most of them in sendai, the city worsted. 500 people are missing. japan's prime minister has declared a nuclear emergency after the cooling system at a nuclear plant failed to people have been ordered to evacuate the area. but authorities in a radiation has been released. a tsunami warnings remain in effect for most of the pacific coastline of or to california. we begin with the latest from japan. >> even as further earthquakes shake japan, the initial cleanup has b
yesterday who is writing about that. >> no doubt about it. first, obviously, the big news out of japan. we why don't we get the latest. >> we are talking about the fifth strongest earthquake on record since 1900. hawaii and other parts of the pacific are bracing for a destructive tsunami triggered by an 8.9 earthquake out of japan. it shows a massive 23-foot wall of watter that swept boats, cars, buildings and tons of debris inland. 32 people have now died in the quake. a figure that is expected to rise. a tsunami warning is now in place for the entire u.s. west coast. that means coastal communities in washington, oregon, california and southern alaska should be on alert and prepared for possible evacuation. a warning is also in place for hawaii, which was struck by a smaller 4.5 earthquake earlier today. now, there are no immediate reports of injuries or damage in hawaii but the state is bracing for the first waves from the tsunami which are expected to hit at 8:00 a.m. eastern time this morning. now, ahead of that, tsunami sirens were sounded and coastal areas are being evacuated. fires
rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national security correspondent david martin at the pentagon. >> an unmanned reconnaissance zone takes off from sicily to survey the damage done by american missiles and bombs. an overhead photo shows what happened to the battlefield. >> you can see the shelters, one of which we have blown up here that is actuall
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
not clear why. >> the smoke rose from the reactor 3. workers temporarily evacuated the facility. japan's nuclear authority said it did not know what was burning,ut there w no explosion. the government tried to reassure the public. >> radioactivity near the reactor has not increased, despite the smoke. we should not forget that even non-hazardous material can catch fire. we must stay calm. >> the operators of the facility are facing more complications. news has emerged of negligence of the plant. a routine inspection was missed just before the quake. components of the cooling system were not checked. oldis and refiters continued to douse the reactors with water on monday to keep them from overheating. the power has been connected to the control center for reactor two. that means the cooling pumps may be restarted. in tokyo, people fear of contaminated food and reactivity 27 times higher than normal has been detected in milk and spinach. the government stopped shipments of food from there. the consumer and vice hot lines are busy. >> i understand your concern. please watch the vegetles t
allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but even if power is restored it is not clear if the cooling pumps will work. meanwhile, the japanese govern
and a third meltdown at japan's nuclear facilities. american troops offshore exposed to radiation, as officials struggle to contain the catastrophe. >>> moment of impact. new images of the tsunami, rushing ashore. breaking through seawalls. rushing past airport security. washing away entire villages. >>> and look at what the waves picked up and left behind. a ferry on a house. a bus on a rooftop. a toilet dangling from power lines. and the man who floated away from his house, clinging for life. rescued ten miles from shore. >> this morning we're live in japan, with diane sawyer, christiane amanpour and david muir. and we ask the question, is this only the beginning of the devastation? >>> and good morning, america. joining us is "world news" anchor, diane sawyer, is who is there in sendai, japan, where the scope of the destruction is staggering. aftershocks still rocking the region. >> dealing with two crises. humanitarian. and an urgent disaster, to avoid a nuclear emergency. there was a third partial meltdown overnight. 11 injured in the blast. and after american officials detec
gwen: ripple effects from japan to libya and everywhere in between as the world works with the fallout from uprising and disaster. tonight on "washington week." >> ample warning was given qaddafi needed to stop his campaign of oppression or be held accountable. gwen: as muammar qaddafi closes in on rebels, the world community reacts. >> i urge you to immediately cease-fire and work with the resolution. >> the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya must be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. gwen: will can do you havey he -- will qaddafi lose his grip? are we on the brink of all-out war? while on the other side of the world, japan copes with a disaster of biblical proportions. after the quake. after the flood. now nuclear fallout. >> there's no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe radiation levels are extremely high. gwen: how japan's calamity could affect us all. covering the week, tom gjelten of npr, coral davenport of "national journal" and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning repor
. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidence actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. so as their unfolding very rapidly on an hour by hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports. we don't really know in detail what's happening. >> we're at a moment in time where, obviously, all of us are heartbroken by the images of what the happening in japan. we're reminded of how american leadership is critical to our closest allies even if those allies are economically advanced and powerful, there are moments when we need our help and we're bound together by a common humanity. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." a live look at times square. it is thursday, march 17th, st. patrick's day, with us on set, pulitzer prize-winning historian, jon meacham, the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch and columnist for "the new york times," nicholas kristof. also in washington, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. a lot going on today. japan looking graver and graver by the moment. >> certainly is. it seems, there's been
of a long war in libya as moammar gadhafi digs in. >>> the nikkei rebounds as japan's nuclear angst eases a little bit and tokyo electric is ordered to pay compensation tore radiation leaks. >>> and his satirical take on world leaders and sports figure s. >>> this just in to cnn, israel former president has been sentenced to seven years in prison for rape. he was convicted on two charges of rape and other charges. throughout the trial, he maintained his innocence and continued to accuse his victims of fabricating stories. in. >>> now to libya and the fourth day of coalition air strikes on the country. >> it appears to be moammar gadhafi's compound. >> through the night, pro-gadhafi sources filled the skies of tripoli with anti-coalition fire. no aircraft was shot down. the coalition fired 159 tomahawk cruise missiles, hitting libyan air defense sites from tripoli to benghazi. missile attacks and air strikes have commanded scud missile sites. activity in the sky may now have peaked. the coalition air forces have moved from an action phase to what they call a patrolling phase now. >>> that
earlier to a correspondent who joined us in north east japan. pitt -- " >> well, they are still trying to figure out what to do with contaminated water. the contamination levels exceed 3500 times the legal limit today. the president has been hospitalized in tokyo for fatigue and dizzy spells, and he was last seen in public the day after the tsunami, so it seems that there is some disorder within the country. also, we have been hearing about the car -- harsh conditions, some sleeping in stairwells and only getting two meals a day of crackers and, and now, they are be putting in a gymnasium about 10 kilometers away from that. it does not look like they will get this thing under control anytime soon. >> but was chris reporting from japan. and there is talk about the safety of exports being sent from japan. these products are sent around the world. it is uncertain how much radiation has leaked from the fukushima facility, and that has led many to ban food imports from the region, but they export much more than food. there are now many unanswered questions about the possible contamination o
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
escalates. >> the world bank says the disaster in japan could cost the economy $235 billion. >>> and the making of a major tie-up in the telecoms industry, can at&t and t-mobile convince regulators to give their proposed merger a go ahead. >>> an international coalition has brought themselves to moammar gadhafi doorstep. coalition spokespeople say ed c ka cak moammar gadhafi was not the target. qatar is making a direct contribution to the air strike with four of its fighter planes. the no-fly zone is intended to protect libyan civilians. coalition forces have pro-gadhafi supporters outside bengahzi, now an erie quiet has settled over the city. >> the impact of the no-fly zone is being felt in the city of bengahzi from 20 miles, 30 kilometers on the outskirts, air strikes brought moammar gadhafi military machine to a halt. the debris spanning miles. at least 70 vehicles that we counted were destroyed ranging from armored pe eed personnel c to tanks with their turrets off. many people are expressing their gratitude to the international community for finally intervening. they b
and this is world business today. as radiation fears spread in japan, residents are warned to stay away from the nuclear power plant while shares in tokyo electric power sink. >>> investors kept their cash close to home. now as the region reels from protests, where will the money go next? >>> and japan airlines emerges from bankruptcy administration. we'll tell you the price it's paid. >> for now let's take you straight over to the stock market action here in europe. and we're 62 minutes into the trading day. here's how it looks right now. we are seeing modest gains right across the board. between about .25% to .6%. the dax was hit initially by the chance angela merkel has suffered a defeat. move on to the currency markets because that's affecting the euro, as well. and here we are. we're looking at 1.4074, 1.5983, just a shade under 160 for the cable. a bit of a weakness. and the japanese yen at 80.66. pauline? >>> well, charles, the markets here in asia finished mostly lower this session. the shanghai composite was the only to post gains boosted by financial stocks. uranium producers and m
that before heading out for a tour of brazil. the president has been tracking the nuclear crisis in japan. we are tracking it as well. crews are drilling holes in several reactors to release pressure. now, abnormal radiation is detected in food near the plant. hello to you. this is "cnn saturday morning." good to be back with you. united nations call for a cease-fire not close to being observed now. massive explosions. moammar gadhafi forces are firing on that city. benghazi, you have been hearing that name for several weeks. it's the heart of the ob ration. we are in benghazi with government forces. >> caller: it seems as if gadhafi's forces began air assault over benghazi in the early morning hours here. they say it was fierce. at 8:45, we saw a plane overhead appearing to be heading south. around 9:10, one of our team witnessed a jet, a fighter jet, fall out of the sky in flames. we have since then spoken to an opposition fighter who told us that was one of their own aircraft they were sending out to try to stop, bring a stop to gadhafi's military assault on this very, very critical city.
the devastation in japan but the nuclear crisis which gets more and more dire by the hour. toyota losing $73 million a day as a result of their plant closings and they're not the only ones sufficie s suffering . no market hit harder than japan's itself. the nikkei plummeting 16% over the past two days and as barry will point out, more than 20% from its levels prior to this crisis. all of those numbers, the worst they've seen in that country, since 1987 wall street had all sorts of common tear today including those who believe there is further room for weak innocence our markets that have run up over the past couple of years driven by frederal reserv money printing. what happen do investors are the rest of us ultimately anticipate will be effect of all of this? that is the question. joining us, ceo and exquity director. barry it looked like any asset that existed became worse less. oil, gold, everybody become worth less, why? >> the fear trade, the risk-on trade, people have a tendency to panic when they don't know what's going on. you don't know how to discount the impact of a possible nucle
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